How To Plant And Grow Tulips

Summers out, bulbs are in, here comes Tulip mania 2021!

Tulipa ‘Queen of Night’

It is never too early to start garden planning for next year! Here at Seed Pantry, we are always planning ahead to make sure Grow Club boxes are filled with the most amazing goodies. One thing we are so excited for are Tulip bulbs, ready to plant in Autumn! Each year we carefully curate an amazing range of gorgeous tulips for you to choose from for your own incredible displays!

Here’s a few tips to help you make the make the most of your planting for stunning Spring displays! 💐

1. Before planting, make sure to choose a well-lit area of the garden where the flowers are likely to get plenty of sunlight. If you are planting in containers or pots, Tulips favour well-drained, semi-fertile soil. This will help aid in their growth.

2. When planting tulips it’s important you plant them at the right depth. Place them pointy end up into a hole in the ground roughly around 3 times the depth of each bulb, or generally around 10cm deep. This will give the bulbs enough cover to protect them from frosts in the winter but also enough depth for roots to establish and form a strong base so they do not topple over as they grow.

3. Space each bulb around 10cm apart from each other to give them each enough space to develop. If you are planting in containers, you can plant them slightly closer together, just make sure not to overfill it with bulbs or none of them will have the resources they need to grow.

4. Simply cover the bulbs over with soil, give them a good drink of water and wait for the magic to happen! Tulips need very little care or maintenance but if you want to help them along when they start form flowers, add a weekly feed of balanced liquid fertiliser to the pot.

Tulip Garden Design 🌷

Tulipa ‘Rem’s Favourite’ and ‘White Elegance’

Tulips are so special that the varieties are separated in to 15 groups, dependent on their characteristics; flowering times, shapes, sizes and colours. Shop our ready-to-plant Tulip collections at the Seed Pantry Tulip shop, or use our quick Tulip groupings guide to help you understand the different Tulip groups, so that you can get creative with your own garden design plans!

Single-coloured tulips can be striking with individual splashes amongst green foliage, you could match light pastels or hot colours. Contrasting colours can work beautifully too e.g. purple and yellows. Multiple mixed colours can be added together if you wanted to create a homely cottage garden theme too.

Sometimes though it can be hard planting and designing spring flower bulb displays in the garden. Where do you plant this and when!? Well, a bulb lasagne is a sure-fire way to create a stunning spring flower display in your own garden spaces, big or small. Check out our video below to create your own! You can read all about them here too!

Neil’s How to make a Bulb Lasagne video

Seed Pantry Team 🌼

Tulip Groups Explained

Botanical terms boggle your mind? Here’s an easy guide to help you understand Tulip groupings…

Don’t be fooled into thinking that the Tulip season is fleeting! There are actually fifteen different groups of Tulips with different flowering times and shapes. By bringing together early, mid-season and late-flowering Tulips, mixing flower forms and colours you can enjoy the burst of colour for twice as long… and we’ve made it a little easier with a Seed Pantry bite-size guide.

GroupFlowering PeriodHeightFeatures Seed Pantry loves…
GreigiiEarly March-April20-30cm/8-12inDistinctive marbled or striped leaves, which spread along the ground.
FosterianaMarch-April25-40cm/10-16inBroad green/grey leaves, sometimes mottled or striped. Large, slender flowers.
Kaufmanniana March-April10-25cm/4-10inAlso known as ‘waterlily Tulips’ as their flowers open flat. Flowers can be bi-coloured with mottled or striped foliage.
SpeciesVaried20-35cm/8-14inPlants tend to be low-growing and small-flowered. Don’t be fooled by their delicate appearance, they are normally much hardier, very beautiful and long-lived than modern hybrids!
RembrandtMarch-MayUp to 40cm/16inA strange example of beauty, renowned for their ‘broken’ flower colours, the striped markings and intricate patterns are actually caused by being infected with the non-spreading ‘Tulip breaking virus’.
Single EarlyLate March-Early AprilUp to 40cm/16inLarge, cup-shaped singular flowers. Their short stems make them ideal for pots.
Double EarlyEarly-Mid AprilUp to 30cm/12inDouble-flowered with peony-like blooms. Brilliant as cut flowers due to their long-lasting properties.
TriumphLate April-Early May40-50cm/16-20inOriginating from hybrids of the Single Early and Single Late cultivars, plants vary from having compact, rounded flowers to having a more conical shape.
DarwinLate April-May45-60cm/18-24inVery large, goblet-like flowers on tall stems, which makes them better suited to borders than pots.
Single LateLate April-May45-75cm/18-30inSingle-flowered with relatively small, oval blooms on long, stiff stems.
ParrotMay40-60cm/16-24inSingle-flowered with unusual curled, twisted and otherwise distorted petals that create amazing shapes. Often bi-coloured.
Lily-floweredMay45-75cm/18-30inSingle-flowers with pointed tips to the petals that flare outwards, not surprisingly… like a Lily!
Double LateLate May45-60cm/18-30inShowy large double flowers that are more rounded than the early double group.
ViridifloraMay30-50cm/12-20inDistinguishable by their colour, the flowers in this group are almost entirely green when they first open, later changing to a second base colour.
FringedVariable40-60cm/16-24inOne of the newer cultivated Tulip types. Petals are edged with delicate ruffles – a very popular group!
Tulip Groupings by Seed Pantry

Whether you plant them in pots or in the ground, Tulips are a spring garden’s perfect companion! We love the striking contrast of orange and purple with Tulipa ‘Apricot Beauty’ Tulipa ‘Queen Of Night‘ and Tulipa ‘Rem’s Favourite’. Choose your own Spring border combinations from the Grow Club Tulip selection, get those green fingers at the ready and check out our handy Tulip planting guide for Autumn planting season!

Click here to see our stunning range of Tulips in the Seed Pantry Grow Club during October and November!

If you’re already a seasoned Grow Clubber, we’d love to see your planting combinations! – please share your pictures with us on Instagram and Facebook, or pop us an email at support@seedpantry.co.uk!

Seed Pantry Team 🌼

How To Plant And Grow Alliums

This Autumn in the Grow Club, we have gone all-in on fabulous ornamental onions, and have an amazing range of new and classic bulbs to choose from!

Allium hollandicum ‘Purple Sensation’ and ‘Ambassador’

Alliums are stunning unique flowers that no other quite compares too. Their large pompoms make them sensational additions to any garden adding structure and form. Pair that with the fact they come in gorgeous decadent blues, purples and stylish whites with star shaped flowers, they are a favourite of choice for all our Grow Club members. Not to mention they’re a favourite with our lovely honeybees, bumblebees and butterflies too!

Here’s a quick planting and care guide for your Alliums! 💐

1. Before planting, make sure to choose a well-lit area of the garden where the plants are likely to get plenty of sunlight. Also make sure you know how tall the alliums will grow, as the difference in size between one variety to another can be drastic. Best planted in well-drained soil, as they do not like heavy, clay or damp soil.

2. Planting depth is important for alliums as their tall stems need support to stand upright when fully grown. Check the required depth of your bulbs with the Seed Pantry guides, before planting, but in general, they need to be planted around 3 times the height of the bulb.

3. Spacing alliums correctly is equally important as the larger types require far more space in order to grow well. Plant smaller growing alliums 7-10cm apart, while the taller ones need at least 20cm between each bulb. If you are growing in pots make sure that they are deep enough to give plants the space needed so that they get enough water – often 40cm deep or more is great for containers.

4. Place your bulbs in the space pointy end up and simply cover the bulb with soil, give them a good drink of water and wait for the magic to happen! Alliums are so easy to grow, they make a very stylish display and the bees love them too!

Alliums in Garden Design

White Alliums used as a single colour pallet look beautiful.

There aren’t many plants that can be considered dainty AND bold, however smaller Allium flowers certainly fit the bill. These flowers will stand out wherever you plant them, their tall pompom like heads makes them immediately eye-catching in any garden display and are perfect for planting amongst flowers and green perennial foliage. They come in such a variety of colours, heights and sizes and once those summer blooms have faded their impressive structural seed heads will continue to spark interest!

Join the Grow Club, add some Alliums to your Grow Club box this month or treat your garden to a few ornamental Onions at the Seed Pantry Allium shop!

Seed Pantry Team 🌼

Home Gardening Tasks and Tips For Summer

A round up of what to do in your Food and Flowers Gardens

It is official, we are now into Summer! The time of t-shirts, shorts and sunglasses is upon us! By now Summer gardens should be well underway and food and flowers should be growing everywhere. There has been a perfect blend of sun and rain to keep everything happy too.

With that though, there are plenty of jobs that still need doing around growing spaces everywhere. So we have been doing all we can to help in your gardens by bringing you weekly and monthly tips on what to do in your spaces.

Let’s get those green fingers going then! Here’s what you can do this month in your food and flower gardens 🏡

Tips for you Summer Garden ☀️

🌊 As it becomes hotter, watering your plants properly becomes critical to their growth. The best time to water plants is in the morning between 6-10 a.m. This is when the temperature is at its coolest which will reduce evaporation and help the water stay in the soil so the plants can absorb it. Remember to give a good drink so the water penetrates the well below the surface to reach the root system.

🌅 As we know, plants love the sun and need it to grow but sometimes they can have too much of it. Too much exposure can cause plants to dry out and get scorched. If too much sun exposure is damaging your plants, make sure to provide them with some extra shade and ensure adequate watering. Move pots out the sun or even cover with a cloth for part of the day.

🌻 Make sure to remove as many weeds as possible. Weeds will steal precious nutrients and moisture from your food and flower plants. They also attract insects and other pests so make sure to remove them to keep all your plants happy.

Flowers 🌼

🚁 As your Summer flowers grow, some of them may need some support so they don’t topple over. For flowers such as Gladioli and Dahlias, you can use plant support stakes to help them grow upright.

🌼 There is still time to plant flowers for some late season colour! Flowers such as Gladioli, Viola and more can be planted now to add to your flower displays this Summer. Check out July’s Grow Club Boxes to see all the flowers you can still plant and grow!

🍃 It is never to early to start planning and planting for next Spring! July is the last month for sowing biennials and hardy perennials. Start sowing Lupins, Foxgloves and more to get ahead of the game for flower displays next year!

💐 Remember to keep picking your sweet pea flowers as they grow and Dahlias. This will help them to keep producing as they channel their energy in creating new flowers.

Food 🥗

🌶️ If you like your chillies hot you can make them spicier by stressing the plant. Once the plant has flowered and started producing peppers, allow the soil to dry out until the plant’s leaves start to wilt and shrivel, then water thoroughly. The stress will help the plant develop more capsaicin inside the peppers which is the chemical that gives chillies heat.

🍵 Harvest your peas to keep them producing! The more your harvest, the more they will produce! Harvesting peas will lead the plant to channel more of its energy into making new peas and thus giving you a better yield from the plant.

🥔 Many potatoes will be ready to harvest now however some may still need a little more time. It is very important with the additional sunlight to mulch and cover the potatoes as they grow. Mound up the soil around your potato plants so no tubers are exposed to the sun which can cause them to turn green and even become poisonous!

🥬 We may now be in summer but you can still continue to successionally sow salad seeds. Carry on sowing seeds little and often in batches so that it is possible to ensure plants are ready to harvest in succession throughout the growing season. This can be done for carrots, salads, beans and more too!

Here are other vegetables from the Seed Pantry Grow Club that can be harvested in July!

  • Chicory ‘Palla Rossa’
  • Onion ‘Long Red Florence’ and ‘Tosca’
  • Pea ‘Delikett’ and ‘Meteor’
  • Beetroot ‘Pablo’
  • Courgette ‘Clarion’ and ‘Orelia’
  • Tomato ‘Big Daddy’ and ‘Outdoor Girl’
  • Raddish ‘Black Spanish Round’
  • Aubergine ‘Clara’ and ‘Jackpot’
  • Potato ‘Maris Piper’, ‘Arran Pilot’ and ‘Pink Fir Apple’
  • Chilli Pepper ‘Apache’, ‘Orange Tyger’ and ‘Spangles’
  • Leafy green salads
  • Shallots

And many more!

That is all for now, folks – stay tuned to our Instagram account and we will have more tips and reminders next week! 😁

Seed Pantry

Home Gardening Tips for May and June

A round up of what to do in your Food and Flowers Gardens

May has seen some beautiful weather, the Seed Pantry garden has been bathed in sunshine. However, we are now hoping for rain, a good soaking is just what the plants need! In the meantime we hope your plants have being sufficiently watered and fed too.

Over the last few weeks, we have been doing all we can to help in your gardens by bringing you weekly and monthly tips on what to do in your spaces.

Let’s continue! Here’s what you can do this month in your food and flower gardens 🏡

Flowers 🌼

🌅 As we move further into Spring and Summer is right around the corner, we can start planting Tender Summer Bulbs. As the frosts are most likely behind us, it is safe to start planting bulbs that are frost sensitive such as Gladioli, Dahlias and Bessera elegans. These can now be planted straight outdoors into pots, containers or borders.

🌷 Early Spring flowers will now be wilting and you can start deadheading by pruning spent flowers. Take garden shears and cut off the flower head from the lower stem once it’s finished flowering. Regularly deadheading your flowers will help channel the plant’s energy into creating new flowers rather than creating seeds, resulting in healthy plants and continual blooms.

🌺 Now that the sun is shining more, most of the garden is happily soaking up the rays. However, we imagine most people have areas of their growing space that are shadier and thus under used. These spaces can be enhanced by planting shade-loving plants such as Hostas, Astilbe and Digitalis.

🌻 From June we will be sowing seeds for biennials, and perennial plants that will flower next spring like Primula, Lupins and Foxgloves.

Now is also the time you can buy many other summer bulbs for planting, including Dahlia, Gladioli, Gloriosa, Tigridia, Anenome, Ranunculus and more…sign up to the Seed Pantry Grow Club for monthly boxes to choose.

Food 🥗

🍅Your Chillies, Tomatoes, and Sweet Peppers sown earlier in Spring can be potted on now, either into larger pots in greenhouses, indoors or outdoors in sheltered warm south facing positions.

Make sure to check the variety requirements of your plants though as the very hottest Chillies require warm temperatures of 25°plus to successfully grow, so these should be kept indoors or in a greenhouse.

🌽 There is still time to sow in small pots of courgettes, butternut, pumpkins, sweetcorn, french and runner beans and second sowings of peas and beans to give you a continual supply well into Autumn. Sowing direct in final growing positions is possible or start these in 9cm pots to grow seedlings for planting out later.

🥕 With the warm weather, vegetables are ready to grow outdoors. Beets, carrots and peas can now all be sown directly outside in veg patches.

🥔 Potatoes should be developing well and in May it is important to earth up/mulch potatoes in their patches and pots. Earthing up potatoes will help reduce late frost damage, encourage larger crops and also help prevent tubers from turning green. To do this mound up soil around your potato plants so no tubers are exposed.

🌱 Remember to keep up with Successional sowing of salads. If you sow seeds little and often in batches, it is possible to ensure plants are ready to harvest in succession throughout the growing season and most of the year. This can be done for carrots, salads, beans and more.

That is all, for now, folks – stay tuned to our Instagram account and we will have more tips and reminders next week! 😁

Seed Pantry

A Seed Pantry Guide To Growing Hosta Plants

Hosta Plants are in the Grow Club this month. They are one of our most favourite plants to grow and for good reason. Hostas have stunning foliage, great leaf textures, colours and shapes to add interest to any garden spaces in shady areas. Not to mention they are really easy to grow!

Let’s run through what hosta plants are, how you can start growing and caring for them, plus details of the varieties we have this month!

What are Hosta Plants?

Hostas, also called plantain lilies, are shade-tolerant perennials that are extremely hardy and require little maintenance. They originate from East Asia with over 2,500 cultivars produced. These cultivars vary in size, colour and textures making each one a unique growing experience.

Brought to Europe in the 1700s, Hostas are one of the most popular and best-selling perennials in the world today.  Although they are best known for their amazing foliage, they also bloom in the summer with tall spikes and, most often, purple flowers.

How to grow and care for your Seed Pantry Hosta Plants?

Here is our quick guide on how to plant and care for your own Hosta plants!

1. Our Hostas come as bare-root plants, so you can start planting them straight away, directly in borders or containers.  As they do not need as much sunlight as most plants, you can position them in shadier parts of your growing space such as under trees or by fences. This gives you the opportunity to fill darker areas of the garden that may have been left a little bare until now!

2. Plant the roots 5-10cm deep and 50cm apart for the bigger varieties like ‘El Nino’ and to 1.5m apart for giants like ‘Sum and Substance’, and plant with 30cm of spacing for the smaller types like ‘Blue Mouse Ears’. Place the roots downwards with the growing points, or eyes facing up.

3. Cover the plants with compost, add a splash of water and wait for the magic to happen! Hostas like fertile, moisture-retentive soil for the best growing conditions.

4. As the plant grows, keep the soil moist and when we move into the Summer and hot weather, make sure to water daily while they are establishing. Slugs and snails may try to eat your hosta plants. One way you can help with this would be to add a companion plant like Astilbe or plants slugs don’t go for. Astilbe is also in the Grow Club this month! Container growing can help fend off slugs too.

Feeding your plants: Mulch borders annually on fertile soil, for poor soil add general fertiliser and mulch in spring,. For containers add weekly balanced liquid feed while growing/establishing for great foliage.

Hostas are hardy perennial plants that die back in winter and will come back each year in spring, so simply leave them to do their thing!

What Hosta Plants do we have in this month’s Grow Club?

Each plant below has been given the RHS’s – Award of Garden Merit (AGM).

Hosta ‘El Nino’ (PBR) (AGM)

These hostas have large variegated leaves that grow to 17cm long. The leaves have clump-forming, blue-green centres with pure white to grey-green-streaked margins! Their flowers are spikes of pale purple bell-shaped, darker striped flowers which are stunning! H. 50cm/80cm wide.

Hosta ‘Fire and Ice’ (AGM)

A favourite from last year, these have striking, variegated, wavy edge foliage with light green with creamy white centres. These grow to be compact and mound-forming with elegant pale lavender flowers. H. 60cm/60cm wide.

Hosta ‘Sum and Substance’ (AGM)

Here are the biggies! Big heart-shaped leaves that grow to 50cm long! These are large mound-forming plants with beautiful light green on nicely veined leaves. Sweet dense pale lilac, bell-shaped flowers on stems grow on these too. H. 90cm/1.5m wide.

Hosta ‘Earth Angel’ (PBR) (AGM)

Another big one! These have outstanding blue-green foliage with creamy white margins. From here they form a thick mound of large heart-shaped leaves. They also grow dense racemes of pale lilac, bell-shaped flowers. H. 75cm/1m wide.

Hosta ‘Krossa Regal’ (AGM)

Another stunning hosta plant with ovate, grey-blue to green leaves that grow to 20cm long. It has superb veining, forming a large upright clump. Once again these have bell-shaped pale purple flowers on stems to 1.5m. H. 90cm/150cm wide.

Hosta ‘Blue Mouse Ears’ (AGM)

These are just the cutest mini Hosta, can be easily grown in pots and border edges. Smooth blue-green leaves, with adorable mouse ear-shaped! They grow beautiful pale purple bell-shaped flowers on spikes too! H. 30cm/30cm wide.

We have all of these and other amazing plants in the Seed Pantry Grow Club this month, so come and check them out to pick your favourites! 😁

Seed Pantry Team

Home Gardening Tips for March and April

Planting For Food and Flower Gardens This Summer

It is a perfect time to grow food and flowers at home to enjoy your own glorious summer garden, so get out your Seed Pantry seeds and bulbs and start planting!

We want to do everything we can to help, so we’ll be bringing you weekly/monthly tips on what to do, just stay tuned to our Instagram account and this blog!

Here’s what you can do this month in your food and flower gardens 🏡

Flowers 🌼

💐 Now is a great time to start potting up Dahlia tubers. Doing this will help them get a head start and flower sooner for you. Keep frost-free in pots and  plant them out in May where you want them to flower. We have a whole range of dahlias available right now in the Grow Club so come and have a look!

Check out our ‘How to plant and grow Dahlias‘ blog to find out more!

💐 There is still time to sow sweet pea seeds too! Start them in 9cm pots with up to 3 seeds per pot and they will germinate in a few weeks! To help growth, it can be beneficial to pinch out sweet pea grow tips at about 15cm tall. This encourages strong side-branching for flowering.

Now is also the time to buy many other summer bulbs for planting, including Begonias, Nerines, Gladioli, Crocosmia, Tigridia, Anenome, Ranunculus and more…sign up to the Seed Pantry Grow Club for monthly boxes to choose.

Food 🥗

The time is now to start your veg patch and sowing food seeds indoors. You can sow these seeds now on your windowsills to get them started!

🥗 Fruiting vegetables can be started in mini propagators such as tomatoes, peppers, chillies, aubergines. Once these geminate and are around 4 weeks old, they can be potted on into 9cm pots, and then at 15cm tall plant into final positions.

For beetroot, chard, broad beans, peas, leeks, kale and sprouting broccoli, these should be started in trays for planting outside in May.

Need some more help getting started!? Check out our blog ‘How to start growing your own vegetables’ for more!

🥗 For leafy greens, spring onions, pak choi, mustards and mizuna,  you can start sowing these into trays for planting outside later also.

We have another blog helping with these too! Check out ‘Growing Fresh Leafy Green Salads’ for more!

🌿 For herbs like basil, parsley, coriander, chives, these can be started in pots or mini propagators on your windowsills now too. It’s great to have fresh ingredients in arms reach!

Need a hand choosing what herbs to grow? We have a list of our favourites here ‘Top 10 best herbs to start growing’

That is all, for now, folks – stay tuned to our Instagram account and we will have some more tips and reminders next week! 😁

Seed Pantry

 

Staying at home and COVID-19

Seed Pantry

Updated 30/03/2020

Hi, We have put together an update from us about your gardens, coronavirus, staying at home and deliveries running as normal.

We are going to make sure everyone has their garden spaces looking great!

With the recent developments around the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), we will be working through this period to make sure you can still enjoy your outdoor spaces and have Seed Pantry activity kits and subscriptions to make your garden spaces great!

We have our small team carefully in place and physically distancing, at home and in the warehouse and we will work hard to make sure you have everything you need.

Government advice on staying at home

At Seed Pantry we love to champion the benefits of being in your garden spaces for general health and wellbeing. The Government advice is this: If you feel well enough you can take part in light exercise within your home or garden. See full government update on staying at home here. So now you can indulge in making your garden the best space this summer.

Royal Mail deliveries – running as normal

Royal Mail, our main delivery service, is operating as normal and lots of our packages fit through the letter box too. We also don’t send signed for parcels generally, so no need to answer the door.

Public Health England (PHE) has advised that people receiving parcels are not at risk of contracting the coronavirus. See full Royal Mail update here. If a parcel won’t fit through your letterbox, Royal Mail will place your item at your door and knock on your door, they will then step aside to a safe distance while you retrieve your item securely. If you are unable to get to the door a card will be left advising other ways to get your parcel, for example asking friends or family to collect it on your behalf.

If there is anything else we can help you with, please let us know! 

…and with any further developments, we will keep you updated.

So get out in your garden spaces and enjoy them.

Ready, steady, grow!

We love you and stay safe.

The Seed Pantry team

Contact us: support@seedpantry.co.uk

Growing Fresh Leafy Green Salads

No garden space is complete without the addition of delicious fresh leafy greens. From lettuce to kale, leafy greens come in all colours, shapes, sizes, textures and flavours. They enjoy the cooler early Spring season and so now is the perfect time to grow them!  This is why healthy salads are a key theme in this month’s Seed Pantry Grow Club boxes.

Leafy Greens couldn’t be easier to start growing too! Most can even be grown indoors or outdoors, in small spaces too, so they are perfect for your kitchen gardener no matter what size space you have!

Let’s run through a quick guide on how you can start growing your own healthy Leafy Green Salads!

1) The best way to start your Leafy Greens is indoors now (March). This will avoid any bad weather or late frosts that can kill or damage the plants. Use trays/small pots or composts discs to start the seedlings off.

2) Sow seeds or scatter over a tray with about 8-10cm depth of compost. Sow seeds at around 1cm deep or you can simply add a 1cm layer compost on top of the seeds if easier. Gently water the soil until moist but not too wet (you don’t want to dislodge the seeds with a great torrent!). You can water the base layer first and just add a little to the top 1cm layer after. 

3)  It should take around 7-14 days for the seeds to germinate. After a further 15 days, you can thin the seedlings by removing some of the plants if they are too tightly packed together, this helps remaining plants grow bigger to their full size (you can check spacing guides on seed packets).  Or you can leave them tightly packed for baby leaf salads. After a total of 30-50 days, most leafy greens should be ready to harvest! Fresh crops for the kitchen table!!

4) For lettuce plants, you can cut the leaves you want for a meal, around 2.5cm above the base of the plants with scissors or a sharp knife. Your plants will grow more leaves for you 2 or 3 times. This is known as cut-and-come-again.

From mid-April, you will also be able to sow directly outside into patches or containers. Follow the same steps for indoor planting and they should also germinate in 7-14 days and be ready to harvest from 30 days!

So as you can see, it really is not that hard! Now the question is, what leafy greens should you start planting?! Probably the best place to start would be with lettuce , spinach and rocket as they are an easy and tasty way to start out. From there you can move on to kale, chard, and even oriental style leafy greens!

We have a whole range in the Grow Club this month, so come check them out and start your journey unto the leafy green world! 😁

Seed Pantry Team

How to plant and grow Dahlias

The delights of the Dahlia season are back at Seed Pantry! We cannot be more excited to get these planted. If you need a hand getting your Dahlias started from the Grow Club, here is our grow guide!

When the last frosts are behind us you can go for planting them directly outside in final growing positions – borders or large containers (40cm+ wide). If you plant them early in March, this will help them get a head start and growing, do this in pots around 3 litres in size and keep them frost-free by placing undercover or protected outside. 

How to plant and grow dahlias

1. Generally starting dahlias early should go in containers that you keep frost-free, then plant them out in final positions around mid-May.  Or from May plant them directly where you want them.

2. Plant dahlias with each bunch of tubers generally spread out a little and lying horizontally around 12cm deep, if it’s a tight bunch of tubers simply pop them in at the required depth. Then loosely add general potting compost. You mix in a few handfuls of sand/grit to help with drainage.

3. Cover the tubers, add a splash of water and wait for the magic to happen! Position early plantings outdoors in a frost-free area.  Transplant the early plantings in May to final growing positions in borders or containers.

4. Dahlias can be tall plants with large flowers, at 1m+, some support or stakes may be needed to avoid them toppling over. They need watering regularly during dry summers, every 2/3 days. You can also add a liquid fertiliser every 2 weeks for top-notch flowers that keep on blooming all summer (tomato feed).

Seed Pantry Team